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of canada about the cabinet picks for hamid karzai. what is the concern over the choices that president karzai is making? guest: he has now made two set of choices. he nominated one slate of cabinet officials, about 24 of them. 17 were rejected by the parliament. but arlin is in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing -- the parliament is, in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing, checks and balances. he looked at the first slate of nominees by president karzai and parliament did not like them. they did confirm the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, the minister of defense and the minister of interior, which handles all of the police. the minister of finance, the minister of agriculture, when the biggest recipients of assistance. -- one of the biggest recipient of assistance. those picks are clear. president karzai has recently over the weekend submitted a second state to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate are lesser- known people. many people have not heard -- many afghans h
. president karzai told a conference that his company -- country was moving slowly toward national security. of the next 45 minutes, british and afghan leaders and the un secretary general outline their goals. general mcchrystal has the international forces serving with such distinction in afghanistan and soon to be over 100,000 strong. foreign ministers, distinguished guests representing over 70 nations and international organizations, including every single member of the 43 nation strong international security assistance force. representing also afghanistan's key regional and muslim partners with whom we are pleased to work and his involvement in this worldwide coalition to support peace and stability in this crucial region are especially welcome to. this is a decisive time for the international cooperation that is helping the afghan people secure and govern their own country. for this conference marked the beginning of the transition process, of bring the necessary conditions under which we can begin district by district, a provident -- province by province, the transferring of responsib
with karzai. this is an opportunity for us to make sure that more draconian steps are taken and said if they steps that have yielded little results. >> i could not agree with you more. i cannot disagree with you at all. this is a moment and it will take a tough hand. >> i noticed the vote has not gone off. and to set fashion, which are drifting along here. -- in truth senate fashion, we are drifting along here. >> i'd prefer to look at this as an opportunity to finish my questions. i.t. why for being here and for your insights. -- thank you for your being here a year and says. my first question before i ask more about the long term, if each of you are satisfied that everything is currently being done that can be done with the short-term relief efforts, dr. former, you talk about how slow the relief efforts are and to a great extent that is because of the lack of infrastructure. is there more than should be done right now to address those relief efforts? >> thank you. i think there is a mismatch between the degree of interest and resources that we as a nation are putting in and the ab
this week. move in return for this additional commitment, we must agree with president karzai's plan for the expansion of the afghan army and police. we will agree today that the afghan national army will # 134,000 by october 2010. and more by 2011. we will commit to supporting a police report with afghan national police numbers preeti 9000 by october of this year. this is a present bigger than our coalition forces. we need more international trainers to do this. we are doubling the number of military teams for the afghan police starting in april of this afghan security forces will be 300,000. international forces will rise to 135,000. the balance will continue to ship toward afghan security control. as president obama made clear last month, by the middle of next year, we have to turn the tide in the fight against the insurgency and also in our work to support the afghan government. today we affirm that the increase in our military efforts must be matched with governance in economic development, a surge to match and complement the current military surge. we have agreed today to back
hamid karzai told the conference that is country is moving slowly toward national security but that training security forces could take years. at an opening session this morning, the british and that an leaders and the un secretary general outlined their goals for the conference. . . >> in the last year britain has suffered hundreds of fatalities per he to the countries represented today recognizes that this mission is vital for our national security. it is vital to the stability of this crucial region and it is vital to the security of our world. we set out last autumn on strategies and we're making progress. the military search is turning to the tide against the taliban- led insurgency. it is at the same time building the capacity of the afghan forces who are fighting alongside us. a civilian surge is insuring that areas are cleared of the taliban and our stabilization teams go in to work with local to halt ground that has been a superdelegate. britain is proud that we lead the largest civilian reconstruction team in afghanistan. during 2009, we doubled the number of brit
government as well. guest: years ago when he met with hamid karzai at a dinner, someone said to him, mr. president, how are you going to address this problem of corruption? in fact, he said, what problem? joe biden, famously -- dinner was over -- he threw his napkin down and said, this dinner is over, and walked out. nothing has happened to defrost his relations with president karzai. both biden and richard holbrooke have terrible relations with karzai. host: james traub is with us to talk about the influence of joe biden. republicans, 202-737-0001. democrats, 202-737-0002. independents, 202-628-0205. you can send us an e-mail or tweet us at. next phone call. caller: i think our president is doing very well. if we wanted joe biden as president, he would be president. i like the idea that our president is intelligent. he is not a puppet, like the last eight years. i think he is doing what he is supposed to be doing. host: james traub? guest: i guess i would agree, in general. he believes he could be a good president. i believe this is almost a desirable alternative. he is a very knowledg
there be a second runoff. thereby, and taking the initial count down under 50% and having president karzai except that, which was a good step for afghanistan. the runoff never happened, but at least the ecc was able to maintain its independence and show that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. with that, let me briefly introduced are three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, no more than 10 minutes each. to my far left is scott worden. he has just returned to the institute here. he was on a leave of absence last year to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. scott was also involved in the elections in 2005, the parliament. you have their bios in their -- in front of you. isabel is sitting next to scott wright -- scott's right. she has worked in afghanistan at back in 2005 as a political adviser and knows quite a lot -- knows quite a lot about the afghanistan elections. to my left is a grant kippen. he was the chairman of the ecc both in 2005 and this past year in 2009. but scott and
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. karzai -- having legitimacy, and i do not think we have that. this will depend on achieving security, which i think is achievable, and with good government comes with our own money invested in jobs. without jobs, afghanistan will not be a positive scenario in the future, but i must conclude by pointing out that this is not going to affect our domestic national security, as we see with the last three plots. the underwear bomber came from nine cheerio region with -- came from nigeria. one of them came from somalia, and major hassan came from washington, d.c. thank you very much. [applause] >> peter has to leave at 11:00, so he should take the first few questions, and there is a microphone in the back of the room for anyone who would like to ask a question. >> i work 30 years of the journalists. i retired two years ago. my question is for peter. what i hear now is exactly what i was hearing before the iraq war, and the promise was saddam hussein was on popular. then we will have a democracy. now it is an islamic system. there is a hypothesis that afghan people love us. the last point i
karzai and afghanistan about corruption, and let him look at our government, he can say, for enough money, you can get anything passed. let me explain what that means for other states and what it means for the state of tennessee. right now, we have 50 less state troopers than we had in 1977, and we have two million more people. . without going back to the senate, go straight to the president, we have 15 million more people who have medicaid. with that comes an obligation from the state to pay for that. we don't have any money to pay for it. right now, our colleges do not have one capital improvement project on a single college campus, the university of tennessee and the 26 board of regents. not a library, dormitory or chemistry lab. we can't add any more people to our medicaid and medicare plans. mr. gingrey: some of the teachers in the great volunteer state are having to take furloughs and leaves of absences and that kind of thing. mr. roe: we are in the 1940's in education. here is another unfunded mandate that comes to the state and nebraska, the people in nebraska don't have to pay fo
it. >> let us turn our attention to afghanistan. do you have faith in president karzai that he will be able to turn sentiment around with troops on the ground there? >> i did not before. he is the president, you can argue about the election all day long. but he is the president. i want to see how the ax and reacts and works with us. getting rid of the unsavory people that have gotten into that government -- i hope he comes across -- there has been an awful lot in the way of trying to get to that country and non-haven for terrorists. it would help all of athens -- afghans. >> this spring will be the time when congress will debate afghanistan. in principle, president obama is expected to ask for as much as $33 billion more to pay for the surge in afghanistan. i was wondering whether you see it as possible for a lot of the democrats' -- potentially a supplemental, depending on what form the $33 billion would take. do you see any way that this may fail? >> i think a lot depends on how the situation is coming along in afghanistan. i think our military will do well. we have excellent
and president karzai in afghanistan, that he will begin to turn things around in that country? guest: i did not before. she is the president, -- he is the president, you can argue about the election all day long. i want to see how he acts and reacts and works with us. getting rid of the unsavory people that have eaten their way into that government. i certainly hope that it comes across. we have expanded an awful lot in the way of blood and treasure in trying to get that country to be a non-haven for terrorists it would help all the afghan people -- it would help all of the afghan people, the administration there. guest: this spring, the congress will debate afghanistan, because president obama is to ask for $33 million more to pay for the search. i was wondering whether you see it as a tough vote for a lot of the democrats, on a potential supplemental, depending on what form the $33 billion will take. do you see any way this supplemental will fail, the vote will fail in congress? guest: i think a lot of it depends on how the situation is coming along in afghanistan. i think our military wi
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
. lot of our senior team in the country. spend 90 minutes with president karzai and most importantly we got out to a agaabad valley and met with the team on the ground there. i told the president in february and i kept my word to him, that if he would give our soldiers the resources they needed to get the job done and come home safe he'd have our support. i expressed the night of the president's west point address concern about the timetable of withdrawal. july of 2011 beginning withdrawal. i don't think it makes sense on a battlefield to tell the enemy when you're going to stop fighting. [applause]. so - i'm - i was pleaseed the president called for reinforcements but i wanted to ask tough questions. what i can report to you as general mcchrystal actually answers to people like me but i answer to people like you so i'll report to you, that i'm told that they have the resources and personnel in the decision that the president has made to get the job done. um... - if they have the time to do it. that's issue. i talked to the afghan leaders and rank and file military afghan militants in t
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
as the prime minister of pakistan and are meeting with president karzai. it was an interesting juxtaposition as we looked to the military component what is happening on the government's side in both pakistan and afghanistan. when it comes to the governance issue in afghanistan, in our meeting with president karzai, he stressed very much the significance of the upcoming parliamentary elections. the need to ensure that under the afghan constitution, that process moves forward to clearly define or establish the legitimacy of the afghan government and their processes as they move ahead. we also had an opportunity to visit the police training centers there in kabul. very important to understand the progress that is being made at the afghan army is being trained. they truly are operating at a deficit in terms of the numbers and bringing more recruits in, but what they have seen in the past several months has been remarkable in terms of the numbers of recruits that have come in. we met with the minister of defense, who indicated that just in the past month, the number of recruits that they have rec
, thereby taking the initial i.e.c. count to 54.-- 54 point something percent and having president karzai accept that, which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course the runoff never happened but at least the e.c.c. was able to maintain its independence and show that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. so with that, let me briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that, so we can have a frank and vibrant discussion and q&a session after that. to my far left, scott warden who just returned to the institute here. he's a senior rule advisor with usit, who was on a leave of absence to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. he was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jdmb. you have their buy yows in front of you, i won't go into too much detail on that. isabel root is desk officer for the e.a.d. at the department of political affairs at the united nati
hope you are speaking for yourself. >> you have done a great job with karzai. this is an opportunity for us to make sure that more draconian steps are taken and said if they steps that have yielded little results. >> i could not agree with you more. i cannot disagree with you at all. this is a moment and it will take a tough hand. >> i noticed the vote has not gone off. and to set fashion, which are drifting along here. -- in truth senate fashion, we are drifting along here. >> i'd prefer to look at this as an opportunity to finish my questions. i.t. why for being here and for your insights. -- thank you for your being here a year and says. my first question before i ask more about the long term, if each of you are satisfied that everything is currently being done that can be done with the short-term relief efforts, dr. former, you talk about how slow the relief efforts are and to a great extent that is because of the lack of infrastructure. is there more than should be done right now to address those relief efforts? >> thank you. i think there is a mismatch between the degree of int
opinion on. it is something that president karzai has announced, a rather ambitious agenda for himself and his country. when there is an alleged oral process, not very much else -- when there is an electoral process, the afghan government is going to have a way that. having elections in may will probably be very technically challenging. that is the decision they ahve to ma -- have to make. they have the right to postpone the election for security reasons. if this is the right they choose to exercise, we could have a number of reforms that could be put in place. the government is going to have to weigh the costs in terms of the focus of the country and how much reform can be done. >> maybe just to add to that, i think one of the problems that you mentioned earlier is the process of decision making. whether the elections are in may, september, they are delayed one year, when you make a decision, you can get about governance in the interim without as much disruption. unfortunately, what tends to happen, you get this offer and counteroffer going back and forth. you can't actually realize t
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
runoff, thereby taking the initial iec countdown to 50% and having president karzai accept that. which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course, the runoff never happened when the opponent pulled out, but they were able to maintain that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. let me just briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that so that we can have a frank and vibrant discussion in q&a after that. to my far left is scott ward iw who was on a leave of absence last year to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. scott was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jemb. you have their bios in front of you, so i will not go into too much detail. isabel has also worked in afghanistan back in 2005 as a political adviser. she knows quite a bit about afghanistan's elections and has been following the process is very closely. finally to my left, grant kippen,
that it does not pose a threat to the stability and security of the people. president karzai announced he would be holding jerka which is a traditional afghan mechanism for trying to reconcile competing views and reach decisions. it was natural for him to say that if they are going to have a peace jerga that people who do not agree with you should normally come. we have a very clear understanding of what we expect in this process. we expect that a lot of the foot soldiers on the battlefield will be leaving the taliban because many of them have wanted to leave. many of them are tired of fighting. we believe the tide is beginning to turn against them and we need incentives in order to protect them and provide alternatives to them to replace the payment they receive as taliban fighters. this is similar to what the american military did in iraq. it became clear that a number of iraqis were tired of the brutality and barbarism of al qaeda as they began to see the potential alternatives available to them in the political system, they began to talk with our military personnel about changing allegiance
they are ready to sign up and support car sky. -- karzai. there is a distinction between the foot soldier and the leaders who gave a safe hache to osama bin laden and al qaeda from which they launched attacks on this country on 9/11. so he sees the distinction. i don't think it should be lost on you. i think we can look at think with some subtlety between these two. and go after the foot soldiers and try to win them over. and ultimately figure out what to do with the hierarchy as we go up the ladder. now, omar is probably the extreme, the foot soldiers are the other extreme. question is what happens to the others? can they be won over? can they become a part of the political fabric that gates spoke of? and that's i think what we are all trying to figure out. i don't know that we have an answer yet. >> at what point does the 30,000 new troops, the department set up to begin accepting converts, from the taliban, reconciliation sectors, like south america. >> it's not an issue for the department. this is an issue for the government of afghanistan. clearly just reading president karzai's comm
. host: what was ,>syour organization's role in london, withççç karzai there, and happened there? guest: what happened in london, >> a lot of donors and multilateral organizations get together and talk about where they need to go next. often, groups of men sit around talking about these priorities and issues and interests that affect women in particular. and rarely are those women's voices included. so often we advocate for women to be on these negotiations and for women's priorities and interests to be represented. in the case of afghanistan, they had a donor conference in london, and okfáwe had groups o afghan women come. and they identified what are afghan3ymwomen's priorities fo reconstruction. and it was useful as the afghanistan çgovernment did no have women xdin these negotiations. and the question was asked, who speaks for afcp' women? there are groups zviçi]ççóof around and geúconvened this group and have them identify their specific priorities for reconstruction and they presented that to the delegate. and told what things were priorities for them and what
while karzai had to survive while he was being neglected, he is a pashtun. however, he is a peaceful one. his father was a parliamentarian. he himself is not pocketing money, or whatever. host: we're going to let it go there and let john newman reply. guest: i know we are short on time. it is crucial and my son talked to me about all the time how important it is, and the soldiers know that, to treat the local population while group a lot of their medics were training kids from the -- were treating kids from the village who were being hurt by the mortars from the taliban who could not shoot them very well. and we are expanding considerably the civilian effort t. host: how does that compare with vietnam? guest: we suffered in the early years of the war for not having paid attention to that. host: jon newman teaches courses in soviet, chinese, and east asian history. this is his book. you can try to track and online. thanks for being with us this morning. that will about do it for washed -- for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back at 7:00 a.m. eastern tomorro
make progress in reducing the ramp at opm and narcotics trade in this area. president karzai has pledged to eradicate poppy crops, but there must be development of crops and methods other than poppy's to sustain the people in this country. in southern afghanistan, the u.s. department of state and agriculture is working one to regain its potential. understanding the reality is on the ground in afghanistan and is essential. we urge the president to follow his advice of making strategic decisions. secretary gates has worked to reaffirm our short and long term goals to our troops and continues the sacrifice. this is very important and we thank him. we now know that the u.s. military faces a threat involving forces. instead, terrorist networks employ unconventional uses of force to remain invisible until their attack. to preempt this threat, we rely heavily on our intelligence gathering systems and professionals at home and abroad. this reminded us of the terrorists. the arrest of a terrorist makes clear that there is much to be reviewed in the way intelligence is shared, collected an
closed. and also is karzai with his cabinet list and with a stand-off with a new list cabinet and others were rejected in the past week. but the parliament showed no sign of bowing to karzai's wishes. and the house speaker promising a thorough vetting of the candidates. we have gwen joining us. caller: good morning, steve, how are you. host: i am great. caller: happy new year. i am calling as an african-american woman, i want to make a comment. i think that senator reid's comment is onpoint. some people donxunderstand what he is saying. i understand where he is coming from. and that's why the african-american community jumps on his side. because we understand why he is where he's coming from. i do not want o-any republican any other person in america to make this racial, because it's not. what he is saying is so true. and the other point is on the book that anne kornblut wrote, in alabama, we have one female and several gentlemen running for mayor, we have an election on 19th of february. the female came in because of [inaudible], but did you know that she lost the two gentlemen. and
and eventual victory by hamid karzai. they discuss the presidential elections for this may. it was held at the u.s. institute of peace in washington, d.c. >> good morning, everyone. we can proceed. thank everyone for coming. my name is john dempsey with the u.s. institute of peace, based in afghanistan. i have the privilege of actually being here in washington this week for this, our first public event on afghanistan of 2010. i'm so happy we have such a good turnout, i recognize some faces here, see a lot of people i haven't seen around before and i look forward to a frank discussion with our distinguished panelist today on a subject that clearly has been getting a lot of attention over the last year, given what we saw in the difficult election season in afghanistan last year but that also has not yet gone away. i think once we got through the difficult process of the elections last year, people were breathing a collective sigh of relief that we moved on and could actually get on with governance and moving toward with strategic objectives in the country, but yet, we have another electio
for reforming washington. >> is there a way that can be accomplished? >> president karzai is heading to london this week and he wants some taliban taken off the u.s. sanctions welist in exchange for their laying down their arms. >> you have heard that general petraeus discussed similar type efforts in afghanistan, political reconciliations. you have per general mcchrystal discussed the same thing. obviously, that is a similar path to what happened in iraq. each of those two individuals have talked through this. this is provided that whoever this is accept the event constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks through the groups that advocate violence. that is what people expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> last week, the win put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in of denniston is about $2.3 billion per year which is 25% of their gross domestic product. who in the administration is really writing point on dealing with issues of corruption in afghanistan? >> a group of people working and our afghan policy -- let me figure out where some of that inform
with america. america stuck karzai in there. then bin lad an was fighting russia and afghanistan for america. that's what drove him to be anti-american. >> more there from houston. dorothy on the republican line. >> my question is, it's wonderful we go over and help all of these countries with the issues they have. we obviously have the power and the financial able >> yemen presents a unique sense of challenges. there are a lot of countries like yemen around the world. places where we see central government authority slowly receding and weakening. if it is terrorism or drug smulling, the international community needs to see how to figure out more and more all of this crisis. >> our guest has been an associate with the middle east program. thank you for the update on yemen this morning. >> take another short break and we'll turn to the topic of mental health in america more of your calls. we'll be right back. >> top prize, $5,000. create a 5-8 minute video about our country's strength. it musten corporate c-span programming. enter before midnight january 20. don't wait another minute. go to s
blocked karzai's plan to governor for kabul. she interweaves a very well- written and interestingly a history that is a well-written, well-organized and based on her own research with original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from the book "the opium season," which details a year in which he was involved as a -- a subcontractor in u.s.a.i.d. efforts in 2004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with a workforce from opium production. it gives a view of the violence, tribal and warlord relations, and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is stored, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban locked to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you -- what to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to value and described the bill which experience in a week -- and described that experience in a way in which any develo
minutes with president karzai, and most importantly, got out towards kandahar and heli'd to the valley. let me tell you, i kept my word that if he would give soldiers the resources they need to come home safe, he would have our support. and i expressed, the night of the west point addressed. -- the night of the west point addressed, i addressed the need for withdrawal. it never makes sense on a battlefield to tell the enemy when you will stop fighting. [applause] i was pleased that the president responded to a call for reinforcements. but what i can report to you is that general mcchrystal answers to people like me, and i answer to people like you. i will report to you. they have the resources and personnel to get the job done. if they have time to do it. that is the issue. i've talked to leadership, to rank and file military. they said look, the taliban has been using july, 2011, for recruitment purposes. look, i do not mind -- michael back there, soldiers always have deadlines. but you did not publish it. that is the point. would i like soldiers to move out of afghanistan by july 201
is the evidentry bar for that. is that smart to target drug dealers because karzai's brother is purporpted to be on the drug trade. is he on the target list? if not, what distinguishes him from one of the dealers who is? so a lot of interesting questions are posed and i think it's right to wonder why a program of assassination conducted in their name, people who don't feel like they have the right to find out about that. host: where did you get your information from? guest: various places. a lot from reporting done by other media. everything has been written about this as well as talking to intelligence, present and former senior intelligence officers. the ranking member of the intelligence committee, he got on our national security blog and commented on this. we put the question up, what do you know about this program? so various sources. think tank people, counter terrorism experts, both here and overseas. host: what was the reaction when you asked the question about the program and trying to learn more about it? guest: i think a lot of people thought it's a good idea to -- i'll tell you
: what was ,>syour organization's role in london, withççç karzai there, and happened there? guest: what happened in london, following conflict what happens is a lot of donors get together to talk about where they go next. what happens often is groups of men sit around and talk about priorities and interests that affect women in particular. and rarely are those women's voices included. so often we advocate for women to be on these negotiations and for women's priorities and interests to be represented. in the case of afghanistan, they had a donor conference in london, and okfáwe had groups o afghan women come. and they identified what are afghan3ymwomen's priorities fo reconstruction. and it was useful as the afghanistan çgovernment did no have women xdin these negotiations. and the question was asked, who speaks for afcp' women? there are groups zviçi]ççóof around and geúconvened this group and have them identify their specific priorities for reconstruction and they presented that to the delegate. and told what things were priorities for them and what to keep funded.
be accomplished? >> yes. yes, sir. >> president karzai is headed to the afghan conference in london this week, and he is saying that he is when asked for that names of some taliban people to be taken off the u.n. sanctions list in return for them laying down their arms and countenancing talks. is this something the white house would be prepared to look at? >> i would simply say that you have heard general petreaus, added his efforts in iraq, discuss similar type efforts in afghanistan at political reconciliation. you have heard general mcchrystal discuss the same thing. so obviously a similar path to what happened in a rack each of those two individuals have talked through. again, provided that whoever this is accepts the afghan constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks with groups that advocate violence. that is what people except -- expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> first on afghanistan as well. last week the u.n. put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in afghanistan is about $2.3 billion a year, about 25% of their gross domestic product. who
. but early signs are encouraging. we are encouraged by the steps president karzai has taken to approve the effectiveness and credibility of his government, and we're committed to working in partnerships to reduce corruption which along with the insurgency is perhaps the greatest threat to afghanistan. and recent polls of public afghan opinion are also encouraging. afghans in significant numbers blame the taliban far more than coalition forces for violence that exists in the country. most afghans believe the taliban is growing weaker, and by huge margins, about 9-1, clearly prefer the afghan government that they have to any alternative the taliban might offer. but our progress on the ground and the attitudes of the afghan people show we're making progress in achieving our objectives and accomplishing our mission in afghanistan as articulated by the president. the third part of our strategy is a stronger partnership with pakistan. the people of pakistan have suffered greatly at the hands of terrorism. pakistanis, civilians, military, police, civilians have sacrificed their lives fighting
will keep a focus -- >> i hope you are speaking for yourself. >> you have done a great job with karzai. this is an opportunity for us to make sure that more draconian steps are taken and said if they steps that have yielded little results. >> i could not agree with you more. i cannot disagree with you at all. this is a moment and it will take a tough hand. >> i noticed the vote has not gone off. and to set fashion, which are drifting along here. -- in truth senate fashion, we are drifting along here. >> i'd prefer to look at this as an opportunity to finish my questions. i.t. why for being here and for your insights. -- thank you for your being here a year and says. my first question before i ask more about the long term, if each of you are satisfied that everything is currently being done that can be done with the short-term relief efforts, dr. former, you talk about how slow the relief efforts are and to a great extent that is because of the lack of infrastructure. is there more than should be done right now to address those relief efforts? >> thank you. i think there is a mismatch b
terrorist threat. our conference on afghanistan, the london conference, will be attended by president karzai, the u.n. secretary-general, 60 nations will be represented. we will be announcing new figures for nato forces and for afghan forces in the time to come. we will be focusing on how the political and civilian surge we plan in afghanistan can match and complement the military surge that is taking place. on wednesday, the day before, the first international meeting will be held to agree how we can strengthen support for yemen in its efforts against al qaeda and how we can help the government of yemen with development and governance. as i said last week in the commons statement i made on security, we note that there are terrorist groups with plans to inflict damage on our country and we are always on alert. we will be vigilant against those who seek to destroy and undermine our democracy and our way of life. let me add one thing also this morning. i sent my condolences to president hariri and the prime minister after the crash of the ethiopian airways flight off the coast of lebanon. we a
these countries face huge challenges. literally just in staying alive. i got to know karzai what a first arrived in afghanistan in 2002 when he had only been in office for a few weeks. eight years later he is still in office facing extraordinarily y challenges. there clearly are a lot of problems. i got to know him personally. but never had he might be wearing at the moment, one thing i am persuaded of is that he is an afghan nationalists. host: next phone call riverhead, new york. caller: ambassador, good morning. i had the recent experience that the third person i talked to came from iraq mentioned it to me that the came from mesopotamia and blamed england for forming a country. they did not bear animosity towards us for coming over there, but felt the only way their country could survived between the different factions was to have a dictatorship. i was wondering if you had experience with any of those ideas? guest: there are as many ideas in iraq about the direction of governance as you might find it in this country. borders throughout the region are artificial in many cases. those borders
the president karzai can't count on parliaments report. most of his nominees expressed discontent with the candidates competence. the "new york times" says 17 were rejected and 17 approved. all but one are currently cabinet ministers the president's office had no comment on friday. they said the news conference would be held today. the effect where is difficult to predict it's he'll try to make recess appointments once the parliament leads for the winter break but there's a deep divide between the president and parliament and could leave a number of ministry as drift under deputy ministers that lack political power. this morning from the "new york times". ellen from sunnyville new york. is yemen the new front on terrorism? caller: absolutely. this president and e reck holder don't get it. they're going into more, al qaeda is going into regions where they understand this president won't do anything to the countries that don't have the capabilities we have and nobody is talking about the fact that this animal, actually was going to kill innocent women and children on an airplane ca
probably take two or three years. and then president karzai really threw cold water on things when he said that afghanistan would not be able to provide for its own security for 15 to 20 years let alone 18 months. so the question is this, when july, 2011 rolls around, will we be at the beginning of the troop withdrawal or just in the middle of it? will we be standing on the cliff or going down the ramp? and will we be at the inflection or point of no return in an open-ended war. the american people and our troops deserve a solid plan. we have the right to know exactly what we're getting into before we start spending billions of dollars more and more and more of our troops' blood. that's why congress must ask the administration some tough questions and demand better answers. you know that's our responsibility, that's our job. especially before we authorize another dime for this foreign occupation. we must make sure that the next appropriation has a much better balance between military and civilian need, a balance that will be considerbly better than the last appropriation. we must make sure
done ar good job with karzai. this an opportunity for us i think to put pressure to make sure that more draconian steps are taken instead of willy-nilly kind of things. i thank you for the hearing and for your testimony. >> i couldn't agree with you more, senator. to come to that point after senator shaheen, i don't disagree with you at all. i think this will take a tough hand of leadership. i know the vote has not gone on. we can go on a little bit. >> i share my colleagues' gratification at the outpouring from not only the united states but from the rest of the world to try and respond to this tragedy. i guess my first question before i ask more about the long term is if each of you are satisfied that everything is currently being done that can be done with the short-term relief efforts, dr. farmer, you talked about how slow the relief efforts are and to a great extent that's because of the lack of infrastructure. but is there more that should be done right now to address those relief efforts? >> thank you very much, senator. i think there is a mismatch between the degree of interest
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